Personal Mobility Devices are a great way to get around and explore, but they are a new and upcoming technology that is not 100% supported across all the states in Australia.

In October 2021 the National Transport Commission’s recommendations regarding national regulations for these devices were agreed to by the majority of States and Territories but not all have implemented them as of January 2022.

We have collated these laws for you by state so you are aware and can make informed decisions.

Personal Mobility Devices (PMD) can be ridden in many areas, but users have to remember they are responsible for their own safety, and that of others.

Riders should be aware that:

  • it is legal to use PMDs on shared paths and footpaths; however, riders must give way to pedestrians
  • persons under 12 years of age must be supervised by an adult when using a PMD
  • a rider cannot carry a passenger
  • PMDs are not permitted on roads or on-road bicycle lanes, except on residential streets where there is no footpath
  • PMDs are also not permitted along the light rail corridor and users should always obey pedestrian traffic lights when crossing at lights
  • an approved bicycle helmet must be worn and the PMD must have a warning device such as a bell
  • the PMD or the rider, must be fitted with a light and reflectors if the rider plans to use the e-scooter at night or in inclement weather
  • you cannot be under the influence of alcohol or a drug or use a mobile phone while riding
  • the speed limit for a PMD on a shared footpath or cycle path is 25km/h, 15km/h for footpaths and 10km/h when at a crossing.

Source: https://www.police.act.gov.au/road-safety/share-road/e-scooters (Jan 2021)

In New South Wales it is currently illegal to use any PMD outside of private property.

Source: https://www.nsw.gov.au/topics/vehicle-registration/unregistered-vehicles/rules/prohibited (Jan 2021)

In Northern Territory it is currently illegal to use any PMD outside of private property.

Source: 

In Queensland, you are required to:

  • Wear an approved Bicycle Helmet while riding.
  • Ride on footpaths.
  • Keep left of oncoming traffic.
  • Have a white front light + rear red light.
  • Ride on local roads. (Roads without centre dividing lines that are 50km/h or less.
  • Only use the bicycle side of a shared path.

And you must not

  • Ride above 25km/h.
  • Ride on Main or CBD roads.
  • Drink and drive (alcohol).
  • Carry passengers.
  • Use your mobile phone while riding.

Source: https://www.qld.gov.au/transport/safety/rules/wheeled-devices/personal-mobility-devices (Jan 2021)

Tasmania have recently (1 Dec 2021) implemented rules supporting PMD use as below.

  • A PMD has at least one wheel, is less than 125cm long, 70cm wide and 135cm high, is less than 45kg and is not capable of travelling faster than 25km/h.
  • A person must be 16 years or older to ride a PMD.
  • You must wear an approved helmet.
  • They can be used on footpaths, shared paths, bicycle paths and local roads which have a speed limit of 50km/h or less, no dividing lines or median strip, and no multiple lanes if a one-way road.
  • They are limited to 15km/h on footpaths.
  • They are limited to 25km/h on shared paths, bicycle paths and roads.
  • PMD users must not use their mobile phone while riding a PMD.
  • PMD users must not ride under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Source: https://www.transport.tas.gov.au/road_safety_and_rules/personal_mobility_devices (Jan 2021)

South Australia have provisionally accepted the recommendations of NTC however have not implemented any of the recommendations at this stage. They are performing trials with hire scooter companies in the Adelaide CBD..

Currently, these devices cannot be used on roads or road related areas such as foot paths, bike/pedestrian tracks, or vehicle parking areas.   Under South Australian legislation, these devices are considered to be motor vehicles. Operating a motor vehicle requires a driver’s licence, registration and compulsory third party insurance. As these devices do not meet the safety standards under the Australian Design Rules they are not eligible for registration.

Source: https://mylicence.sa.gov.au/road-rules/riding_motorised_scooters Feb 2022

Victoria have provisionally accepted the recommendations of NTC however have not implemented any of the recommendations at this stage. They are performing trials with hire scooter companies.

Currently, if your motorised scooter:

  • is powered by a petrol motor has an electric motor with a maximum power greater than 200 watts
  • has a maximum speed greater than 10 km/h
  • then it cannot be legally used on a road or any road related areas, including footpaths, share paths and public areas. The fine for an illegal device is $826.

Source: https://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/safety-and-road-rules/road-rules/a-to-z-of-road-rules/scooters-and-wheeled-recreational-devices

Western Australia has recently (4 Dec 2021) adopted new eRideable rules, as below.   What is considered an eRideable device infographic

What is considered an eRideable?

  • A small electric rideable device with at least one wheel
  • Is less than 125cm long, 70cm wide and 135cm high
  • Is 25kg or less and not capable of travelling faster than 25km/h on level ground

Where can I ride my eRideable?

  • eRideables can be ridden on
    • footpaths
    • bicycle paths
    • shared paths
    • local roads without centre lines and a speed limit of 50km/h or less
  • They may be ridden in bicycle lanes, but only on roads with a speed limit of 50km/h or less

How fast can I travel on my eRideable?

  • eRideables ridden on footpaths will be restricted to 10km/h
  • eRideables ridden on bicycle paths, shared paths and local roads can be ridden up to 25km/h

What safety equipment is required in order to be lawful?

  • eRiders must wear an approved helmet
  • eRiders must have lights and reflectors when riding at night
  • Where possible, a bell or other warning device must be fitted to the eRideable and sounded when approaching pedestrians on footpaths
Source: https://www.wa.gov.au/organisation/road-safety-commission/erideables (Jan 2021)